Loading...

ICOPA XI - Tasmania 2006

ICOPA XI
Held in Hobart, Tasmania. 7-11th of February 2006


Preface

The following were themes explored and expanded at the conference:

The Politics of Imprisonment

Northern Ireland, Palestine and the Middle East, (Post) Colonial Justice Nigeria and West Africa, South Africa: ANC, Brazil, USA, Canada.

Contemporary Forms of Penal Custom

Post Carceral Resettlement

Organising Inside: Prisoners' resistance and the Outside Community, Writing and Art as Resistance, Barriers to Reintegration, Surveillance, Organising in the Community - Exprisoners' Organisations, Convict Criminology.

Action Now

Proposals for the future.

 

ICOPA XI linked with the ANZSOC criminology conference over 7-9th of February 2006 in Tasmania. They held four plenary sessions around the theme of Human Rights:

•Prisoners and Human Rights

Refugees and Human Rights

State Crime and Human Rights

Terrorism, Racism and Human Rights

more information:

http://www.lawlink.nsw.gov.au/lawlink\bocsar\bocsar.nsf/pages/index


ICOPA XI - VAN DIEMAN'S LAND 2006! Tasmania is an ideal place to discuss punishment. It used to be called Van Dieman's Land, and was the place where most of the original convicts were sent from England from 1788 until the 1850's. It was the ultimate as a penal colony, was almost entirely a prison, and changed its name to avoid the historic shame. It had penal settlements where convicts were tortured - all well documented. And the convict responses are very special learning experiences, still valid today.

Robert Hughes "The Fatal Shore"
ISBN 0 099 45915 9
- well worth the read.

 

Tasmania Video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VtZY159f0p0

A short version of the 63 minute documentary concerning the 11th International Conference on Penal Abolition held in Tasmania over the 9-11th February 2006. The documentary addresses penal abolition as a concept and issues surrounding that policy.

The full video is now available on DVD - Aust $30 incl post - email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

 

ICOPA XI Papers & Briefs - 1: A-C
Hobart, Tasmania. 7-11th of February 2006

Authors, topics and documents presented at the conference - where possible in both Word and PDF formats


Authors and Presenters Biographies
To view all presenters and authors biographies, click here (in PDF format)

Index of Papers and Briefs - by Author

Authors - A-C

Drugs and Prisons: Shooting for Harm Reduction

Kat Armstrong (Australia) Tightening the Screws: Prisoners’ Action and the Offer of Hope
Kat Armstrong (Australia) Extract from his letter dated 28 January 2006
Malcolm Baker Pathways to Resettlement
Tiffany Bodiam (Australia) How the NSW Law and Order Train Ran Over Prison Abolition
Brett Collins (Australia) Abolitionism and the Prison Industrial Complex: Strategies for Change 
Brett Collins (Australia) From Victimization to Criminalization: What Next?
Vicki Chartrand (Canada) Abolitionism and the Prison Industrial Complex: Strategies for Change
Vicki Chartrand (Canada) The Hole – Prison Segregation
Dr Bree Carlton & Craig W.J. Minogue (Australia) It’s Back to the Future: Have the Lessons of Jika Jika Been Forgotten?
Bree Carlton & Craig Minogue *Pathways to Prison Abolition - Reflecting on the New Zealand Experience
Jim Consedine (New Zealand) Being Heard: Stories of Tasmanian Imprisonment
Rodney Crosswell


Authors - D-M
 [click here]
Authors - N-Z [click here]

Abolitionism and the Prison Industrial Complex:
Strategies for Change 

Brett Collins (Australia)

Prisons have long failed every test as a useful institution serving their communities. But they survive due to the entrenched interests they maintain and the mythology surrounding their inhabitants. Our task is to show that the institution is counterproductive. To show that the worst fears of the public are more likely due to imprisonment. Trying to warehouse the problems creates that worse crime. That people in prison are normal and degrading them is uncivilised, reducing our society as did slavery. This can only happen by returning to prisoners their voices.
The Hole – Prison Segregation
Dr Bree Carlton & Craig W.J. Minogue (Australia)

Historically, maximum-security and supermax prisons within prisons such as Pentridge’s Jika Jika, Long Bay’s Katingal and in recent times the Goulburn Supermax have been designed to exert exclusive disciplinary and coercive control over the system’s supposedly high-risk, ‘unruly’ and ‘dangerous’ prisoners through the application of hi-tech security devices, remote controls and psychological strategies including sensory deprivation and solitary confinement. This paper highlights that despite the well-known brutalising and potentially lethal impacts of such regimes, as demonstrated by the Jika experience, recent developments in Victoria’s Barwon Prison suggest that supermax conditions are currently being introduced and ‘normalised’ in the mainstream prison system. This process of securitisation or ‘Marionisation’ has been implemented at the expense of much-needed educational, mental health and rehabilitative programs.
Being Heard: Stories of Tasmanian Imprisonment
Rodney Crosswell

“Once a crime always a crime” The first few months post prison is a critical time in which ex-prisoners need support from dedicated agencies that understand the particular needs of prisoners. There are no dedicated services in Tasmania and those that take on the issues of ex-prisoners are overworked and under funded. As well, no pre-release programs of any consequence exist. On top of dealing with complex post-release issues this speaker will also discuss dealing with the difficult attitude of ‘once a crime always a crim’e.
Extract from his letter dated 28 January 2006
Malcolm Baker

Malcolm is presently in Long Bay's hospital facility and he writes:“ On induction into the hospital most blokes act or talk rationally, but after an interview with a psych, you are said to be mentally ill and then put on drugs you don't want. If you refuse, you are held down and injected with ‘Aquafaze’.It consists of up to five different drugs and has a bad effect on all inmates. You have to make the choice to keep getting that or take pills, which all have bad side-effects, but none as bad as ‘Aquafaze’, or so it's called. The side effects interfere with speech, memory and behaviour. In my case I was forced to take it twice, via injections, then’ when I took the pills, the side-effects were bad for 12 months or so.Then they finally found a pill that agreed with me and I could act normal again and the psych said to me, “You were totally not with it when I came here”. I said, “Bullshit, it was all the drugs ‘forced’ on me, and the others I took, in fear of injections with Aquafaze”. I ask to be weaned off them, so I could show the real me without drugs, but he said “No”. If I'm not wrong, this amounts to mental and physical abuse. MENTAL CRUELTY AND PHYSICAL CRUELTY, still chargeable offences and systematic abuse, with intent.”
It’s Back to the Future: Have the Lessons of Jika Jika Been Forgotten?
Bree Carlton & Craig Minogue*

This paper highlights that despite the well-known brutalising and potentially lethal impacts of such regimes, as demonstrated by the Jika Jika experience, a recent string of security upgrades in Victoria’s Barwon Prison suggest that supermax conditions are currently being introduced and ‘normalised’ in the mainstream prison system.
Pathways to Prison Abolition - Reflecting on the New Zealand Experience
Jim Consedine (New Zealand)

Introduction I sometimes wonder whether western culture is obsessed with street crime and its effects. Practically every night we are inundated with television 'news' stories of crime committed in our localities and around the world. The first television news bulletin I saw when I arrived in the United States commenced with four 'street crime' crime stories. One was a murder arrest, while the other three were stories of assaults. Only then the bulletin moved onto other world issues. We need to reassess our understanding of crime and ask why it is that corporate crime and governmental crime advance virtually unhindered, while localised 'street crime' has become so central to so many. The answer lies somewhere in the mixed realm of our own hidden fears and our sense of powerlessness in the face of crime, and the immense power of corporate vested interests who gain so much from the current situation and control so much of what we view and read.
From Victimization to Criminalization: What Next?
Vicki Chartrand (Canada)

The notion of victim is a common and often overlooked term used in the field of criminal justice. While the concept of victim is often neglected, it nonetheless carries a very specific and narrow understanding that promotes and reproduces ‘crime control’ and ‘punitive’ practices. Current dominant understandings not only shape and limit a notion of ‘victim’, but also determine who is entitled such status and when. I look at the works of Robert Elias (1993) to shed light on this volatile term and, in so doing, how it might be considered otherwise.
Abolitionism and the Prison Industrial Complex: Strategies for Change
Vicki Chartrand (Canada)

Penal abolition is often referred to as both a theory and practice. Borrowing from the works of Thomas Mathiesen (1974) and Michel Foucault, I consider how abolition can be thought of and practiced in a way to avoid the dangers often present in an abolitionist perspective and approach.
Pathways to Resettlement
Tiffany Bodiam (Australia)

Unprecedented increases in prison populations and imprisonment rates nationally and internationally, particularly in the last two decades, have caused concern on a global front. As a consequence, western society is now witnessing an unmatched number of prisoners released to the community each year. Prisoner release has traditionally raised questions of public safety, and the social and economic costs for communities. Indeed recidivism is one of the few prisoner release issues to make it into public and political debates. Current discussions however, dominated by concerns for broader social issues of risk, cripplingly limit the ways society understands and engages with released men and women. Most significantly, the omission of prisoner narratives and consideration to individual experiences and understandings of release positions a discourse that fails to acknowledge the most critical voice. This paper draws on interviews with released men and women, opening up new discussions of prison release and engaging with critical experiences that are often unspoken and faced in isolation.
How the NSW Law and Order Train Ran Over Prison Abolition
Brett Collins (Australia)

We had a head of steam in the 1970’s where prisoner action forced a Royal Commission and exposed over 34 years of “brutality and savagery” by the state. But the gains made were illusory and without structural support. Instead disgraced prison officers were promoted to greater authority, to the top of the Department and to control the Minister, networking with police as never before, and becoming feared arms of the state. Now prisoner numbers have doubled, and sentences are much longer. Prisoners are divided into sealed pods of 30 together, divided on racial lines and from each other, demoralised by removal of incentives and opportunities for development, made sick with diseases and desperate for drugs, separated from their families, and undermined by arbitrary controls of everything that is important to them. Recidivist rates are 45% and rising. The public feels less safe. The budget has ballooned in failure. The law and order train has run off the rails out of control and presents the case for abolition.
Drugs and Prisons: Shooting for Harm Reduction
Kat Armstrong (Australia)

This talk will discuss the drug use in NSW prisons and how 75% of all people sent to prison are for drug related crimes. Highlighted will be that 20% of prisoners actually use drugs for the first time, whilst being in custody. Recent research indicates there is about one chance in seven that an uninfected NSW prisoner will contact Hep C in prison, with upwards of 1,000 new infections behind that state’s bars every year. This indicates the significant need for the introduction of Needle Syringe Programs into prisons.
Tightening the Screws: Prisoners’ Action and the Offer of Hope
Kat Armstrong (Australia)

Prisoner’s showed their unpreparedness to accept inhumane treatment and rioted at Bathurst Jail in NSW in1974. Prisoners burned the jail to the ground and the prison was temporarily closed. This action forced the Nagle Royal Commission and it’s Report. It was then, and still is considered to be the blue print for the direction of Australian Prisons. Regardless of this in the last 25 years prison authorities have increasingly dominated and reversed any positive change. The Offer of Hope represents a new and non-violent prisoner initiative, giving direction for the future.

 

 

ICOPA XI Papers & Briefs - 2 : D-M
Hobart, Tasmania. 7-11th of February 2006

Authors and Topics presented at the conference - where possible in both Word and PDF formats


Authors and Presenters Biographies
To view all presenters and authors biographies,
 click here (in PDF format)

Index of Papers and Briefs - by Author

Authors - A-C [click here]

Authors - D-M

Alternatives to Punishment

Caroline Dean (Australia) A story to give strength to others who are suffering in silence
Vickie Douglas Message to the Delegates at Hobart
Frank Dunbaugh Prisoner Rape Support Package: Addressing sexual assault in men’s prisons

By David Denborough and the 
Preventing Prisoner Rape Project Clarifying the Goals of “Transformative Justice” 
Frank M. Dunbaugh, Juris Doctor Penal Abolition: Social Revolution Starts with Children
Marc Forget (Canada) How the NSW Law and Order Train Ran Over Prison Abolition
Ian Fraser (Australia) Abolitionism and the Prison Industrial Complex: Strategies for Change
Prof Bob Gaucher (Canada) The Death Penalty
Prof Bob Gaucher (Canada) Preventing Violence - Preventing Crime - Preventing A Prison Experience
Gregory Kable Alternatives to Punishment
Pat Magill (NZ) Being Heard - Stories of Tasmanian Imprisonment
Mick Marlow Prison Enlightenment
Michael J. Marlow - Risdon Prison Pathways to Resettlement 

Melissa Munn (Canada) Pathways to Resettlement 
Brenda Murphy (Northern Ireland)

Authors - N-Z [click here]

Alternatives to Punishment
Caroline Dean (Australia)

This paper discusses the alarming increase in prison populations despite an overall drop in crime rates. This growth can be explained by changes in criminal justice policy but asks the question, at what cost? This paper will examine the significant social and economic implications of these policy decisions and look at the efficacy of reducing prison populations through the model of decarceration using the Finnish experience as an example.
How the NSW Law and Order Train Ran Over Prison Abolition
Ian Fraser (Australia)

The need for prison abolition is even more evident with the breakdown of social services, education and health, to the community. Addressing these needs is the primary task of activists - a prerequisite for abolition. The brutal and racist prison regime ensures its own existence by damaging everyone it houses.
Prison Enlightenment
Michael J. Marlow - Risdon Prison

The quest and combine zest for prison reform and accompanying inner enlightenment, weighs rather precariously on so many shoulders. You're welcome attendance at this seminar, and forum, is a clear indication of your will and need to see positive changes in many, many, prisons, both in Australia and worldwide.[pdf] [word]
Word Download / PDF Download
Preventing Violence - Preventing Crime - Preventing A Prison Experience
Gregory Kable

Lack of social skills in my family brought on smacking and violence as a means to solve problems. When I learned how wrong this was it saddened me to learn that my own parents lacked the social skills needed to use dialogue for solving problems and taught me how to use violence.
Word Download the paper here
Prisoner Rape Support Package: Addressing sexual assault in men’s prisons
By David Denborough and the Preventing Prisoner Rape Project

The following support package has been developed to try to provide assistance to men who have been raped or sexually assaulted in prison. It has been developed by the Preventing Prisoner Rape Project.
This project, based at Dulwich Centre in Adelaide, Australia, is hoping to: raise awareness about the issue of rape in prisons; reach out and support prison rape survivors; support those workers both inside and outside prisons who are trying to deal with the issue of sexual violence in detention; and bring about appropriate law reform and changes to prison administration in order to prevent prisoner rape.
PDF Download the paper here
Pathways to Resettlement 
Melissa Munn (Canada)

Despite the considerable body of criminological literature on prisons, prisoners and release, the experience of resettlement by ex-prisoners is often overlooked; focus remains on what ‘causes’ recidivism rather than on the processes through which success is established. This paper examines the experiences of former long-term prisoners in Canada who have negotiated the carceral and post-carceral system effectively and have been able to re-establish themselves in the community. Based on ethnographic research gathered through in-depth interviews with men who have been out of prison for several years, this paper explores some of the major resettlement challenges encountered and management strategies employed. Major themes identified by those interviewed include lost time, stigmatization, work and vulnerability to the state. 
Pathways to Resettlement 
Brenda Murphy (Northern Ireland)

I intend to relate my own experience of imprisonment and its aftermath, and how this relates to others in other parts of the world, both in recent decades and today. More specifically I will seek to expand on how the nature of the penal system, and what happens to prisoners, is part of a bigger parallel process within communities and society at large. I will argue that active resistance is essential for survival both during incarceration and in the aftermath.The penal system aims not only to punish and control, but also injure physically, emotionally and mentally. This process is not only intentional and perverse but also totally invasive of the person. I will argue that this is re-enacted by means of barriers to reintegration and at all levels in one’s life – personal, social and political. In particular is my experience of demonisation and being defined ‘out of existence’ and how we can and must redefine ourselves, as it were, back into existence.
Alternatives to Punishment
Pat Magill (NZ)

Napier, a city in New Zealand of only 56,000, provides 7 % of its people towards New Zealand’s growing prison complex. The Maori represent 50% of the prison population, and comprise only 16% of the New Zealand population
Being Heard - Stories of Tasmanian Imprisonment
Mick Marlow

What is the real reason behind solitary and segregation units? What are the effects and impact of using a management philosophy that houses prisoners in a punishment division (solitary confinement) and behaviour management unit (segregation) for long periods of time. This speaker will talk of his three years in solitary and the segregation unit and why he believes it is happening.
Abolitionism and the Prison Industrial Complex: Strategies for Change
Prof Bob Gaucher (Canada)

The current conditions of mass incarceration and entrenched industrialization; social exclusion through criminalization; and the history of failure and cooptation of soft end alternatives (e.g. restorative justice), demands that the penal abolition movement reassess its strategies. Author suggests that a renewed focus upon prisoners and prisons would reenergise the movement.
The Death Penalty
Prof Bob Gaucher (Canada)

James Allridge was executed by the state of Texas on August 26, 2004, after 18 years on Death Row. During those years he established himself as a writer and artist; his drawings were exhibited in Europe, USA and Canada. He contributed to the campaigned against the death penalty in Texas/USA. The basis of Allridge`s final challenge of the death penalty was on the basis of his `rehabilitation` as exemplified by his work and the outside, international support he garnered.
Clarifying the Goals of “Transformative Justice” 
Frank M. Dunbaugh, Juris Doctor

Penal abolitionist, Dr. Ruth Morris, the founder of ICOPA (International Conference on Penal Abolition), began in the early 1990’s to propose a new paradigm which she called “Transformative Justice.” This is Dr. Morris’ great legacy, and it should continue to guide ICOPA’s focus. She clearly articulated why the existing system of punitive (or retributive) justice is a failure. She asked abolitionists to reject the popular alternative of “restorative justice”, saying that it does not reach the underlying problems that lead people to anti-social behavior.
Penal Abolition: Social Revolution Starts with Children
Marc Forget (Canada)

In order to become accepted as a legitimate social goal, penal abolition should not be discussed as an end in itself, but rather as one of the many things that must happen if we are to move along the long road toward a more democratic, just and peaceful society. Penal abolition is only possible in the context of a deep and broad social transformation or revolution the likes of which humanity has yet to allow itself to dream of. To most people the mere suggestion that we should stop using punishment is simply ludicrous. Reaching these ordinary people requires the development of a cohesive and realistic vision. To have credibility this vision must be set in a framework that acknowledges history, rejects any alignment with old political notions of left and right, and highlights practical alternatives we can feasibly adopt. As demonstrated in The Emperor’s New Clothes, children are the ones who can help us see through the age old conditioning that makes punishment, authority, and even war, seem rational, acceptable, and to some, even desirable. Therefore the emphasis of the presentation will be on how we can work with children, helping them create punishment-free environments beginning with schools, games and sports.
A story to give strength to others who are suffering in silence
Vickie Douglas

I am speaking here today in honor and love for my son Chris. Chris died on the 4th August 1999 at Risdon Prison….he was just 18.I am currently suing the State of Tasmania for not keeping my son alive and safe…… the trial is due to commence ….so I am somewhat restricted to what I can say due to these proceedings.
My 17 years old son Chris was held on remand at Risdon Prison. He was housed with the sex offenders and pedophiles. 
PDF Download the paper here
Message to the Delegates at Hobart
Frank Dunbaugh

When I attended ICOPA 1 in Toronto in 1983, our sole objective was to ensure that ICOPA 1 was not the last ICOPA. We put together a small committee to see to it that ICOPA 2 would be organized in Europe. It was only through the immense efforts of our founder, the now departed Dr. Ruth Morris, that the ICOPA conferences have continued all of these years. Serious abolitionists must fear that without Ruth’s dedication and energy, the movement will stop moving.
Word Download / PDF Download

 

 

ICOPA XI Papers & Briefs - 3 : N-Z
Hobart, Tasmania. 7-11th of February 2006

Authors, topics and documents presented at the conference - where possible in both Word and PDF formats


Authors and Presenters Biographies
To view all presenters and authors biographies, click here (in PDF format)

Index of Papers and Briefs

Authors - A-C [click here ]
Authors - D-M [click here ]

Authors - N-Z

Women’s Imprisonment

Felix Obi (Nigeria) Lessons from Africa: Challenges and Contributions to Penal Abolitionism
Felix Obi (Nigeria) Pathways to Resettlement
Felix Obi (Nigeria) From Hell to Hell: The Travails of Ex-Prisoners in Nigeria
Ogbozor Odoemena Post Colonial Reform of Nigerian Prisons: Issues and Challenges
Dr Uju Agomoh and Ernest Ogbozor The State of Women Prisoners in Nigeria : Problems and Options
Dr Uju Agomoh and Ernest Ogbozor Penal Abolition: Rendering Radical Rational 
Kim Pate (Canada) Deaths in Custody
Charandev Singh (Australia) Human Rights Behind Bars
Charandev Singh (Australia) The Death Penalty
Cassandra Shaylor (USA) Sexual Assault in Male Prisons
Mike Tamplin

Human Rights Behind Bars
Charandev Singh (Australia)

"Don’t even mention human rights in here - no one thinks that we’re even human"
- Rights talk and struggle - possibilities and abolition.
Sexual Assault in Male Prisons
Mike Tamplin

Introduction to Risdon Prison
In 1999/2000 a member of God’s Squad Launceston chapter was approached by the then Attorney General Peter Patmore to assist with young men incarcerated in Risdon Prison, the 18-25 year age group. This was because there had been 5 young men who had suicided in a relatively short space of time. Chris Douglas died on the 4th August 1999 at Risdon Prison….he was just 18. On the 17th September at Risdon Prison Thomas Holmes was found hanged - his death was followed on by Laurence Santos 19th October, Jack Newman and Fabian Long 10th January 2000.
Word Download / PDF Download
Pathways to Resettlement
Felix Obi (Nigeria)

It is paradoxical that the difference between prison life and living in the ‘free’ Nigeria society of today is fast closing up as the inmate in some instances feel better off in prison than outside prison. Ex-prisoners moves from a life of hell typical by overcrowded cells, poor feeding, poor healthcare, maltreatment by prison officers, life full of denials to another life outside the prison walls that tend to have some similarities with what they had gone through in prison. Since the society decide to shut the doors of positive living against the exprisoners then they feel justified to force the doors open even it has to do it by returning to the same crime that took them to prison in the first instance
The State of Women Prisoners in Nigeria: Problems and Options
Dr Uju Agomoh and Ernest Ogbozor

Quote: "I was forced to drink the blood of a dead woman to prove my innocence of a murder case. I was expected to die after 3 days if guilty of the offence. But I did not die - Police then remanded me in prison where I had my first baby. I am still awaiting trial for close to two years"
PDF Presentation Download the paper here
The Death Penalty
Cassandra Shaylor (USA)

Will focus on the relationship between death penalty abolitionism and abolition as a whole - the various conflicts and contests that come up around where those movements do and don’t intersect.
Penal Abolition: Rendering Radical Rational 
Kim Pate (Canada)

To many, the idea of penal abolition is considered extremely radical. Kim will discuss how anti-oppressive and substantive equality analyses lead logically to an abolitionist paradigm. She will invite us to recognize the rationality of decarceration and encourage all of us to walk the walk and not merely talk the talk of abolition.
Deaths in Custody
Charandev Singh (Australia)

Deadly Punishments and Lethal Indifference - Strategising to end deaths in custody in the context of the abolition of prisons
From Hell to Hell: The Travails of Ex-Prisoners in Nigeria
Ogbozor Odoemena

It is paradoxical that the difference between prison life and living in the 'free' Nigeria society of today is fast closing up as the inmate in some instances feel better off in prison than outside prison. Ex-prisoners moves from a life of hell typical by overcrowded cells, poor feeding, poor healthcare, maltreatment by prison officers, life full of denials to another life outside the prison walls that tend to have some similarities with what they had gone through in prison.
PDF Presentation Download the paper here
Post Colonial Reform of Nigerian Prisons: Issues and Challenges
Dr Uju Agomoh and Ernest Ogbozor

The penal system today in some African countries (ie. Nigeria, Ghana, Kenya) dates back to the colonial era and modelled on the British system. It is a secretive system with the emphasis on punishment and deterrence.
PDF Presentation Download the paper here
Women’s Imprisonment
Felix Obi (Nigeria)

The treatment given to women prisoners and mothers with babies in prison is an outflow of the general problem of gender discrimination encountered by women in Nigeria and the world over. If women are generally disadvantaged, it follows then that women prisoners and nursing mothers in prison are much more disadvantaged. Efforts have been made at the international, regional and, to some extent, national levels by way of setting standard provisions on treatment of female prisoners, taking into consideration their dignity and worth as human beings with human rights, to cater for the special needs of this vulnerable group of prisoners. However, study has shown that prison is a place full of antagonism for its inmates; a place of torture, hunger, disease and neglect; in fact a house of death.The situation of mothers with babies in Nigeria prison really demands serious attention, as it is complex and delicate, which puts women prisoners in a unique state of dilemma, caring for her self and her child a times. The mothers are not provided with required sanitary and other requirements exposing them to unhygienic and filthy environment. The treatment given to women prisoners and mothers with babies in prison amount to deliberate torture, inhumane and degrading treatment, this questions the continued retention of female prison as a corrective institution.
Lessons from Africa: Challenges and Contributions to Penal Abolitionism
Felix Obi (Nigeria)

Jefferson A.M. (2005) in his article “Reforming Nigeria Prison: Rehabilitating a Deviant State” published in British Journal of Criminology, summarises the status of reform in Nigeria prisons as an attempt to rehabilitate a deviant state because they do not conform to appropriate international norms, standards and convention.Most African prison systems are modelled by colonial prison administration with emphasis on punishment and deterrence. This negates the original objective of the establishment of the prison as corrective institution, for reformation, rehabilitation and re-integration of inmates. The position of prison in criminal justice administration in Nigeria today can best be regarded as an endangered sub-sector, occupying an inferior position in government priorities. Poverty, socio-economic and other constrains constitute bottlenecks to reformation effort.

 

 

 

  • get involved2
  • donate
  • breakout-logo2

 

 

Justice Action
Trades Hall, Level 2, Suite 204
4 Goulburn Street
Sydney NSW 2000, Australia

T 02 9283 0123
F 02 9283 0112
E ja@justiceaction.org.au
© 2017 Breakout Media Communications

breakout-logo  womens justice network icon logo-community